Mercury Mines & Estuaries

Mercury Spills in Our Homes Accidental Release and Clean-up of Small Quantities of ( less than 3 grams) Mercury is a unique metal and has some rather amazing properties. It’s the only metal that is a liquid at room temperature. It was originally described as “silver water” in ancient Greece. Because it is both a






Lead: An Introduction

Wednesday, 11 June 2014 by
Lead Testing for Dust

Lead is a natural elemental metal that has many uses and has been used through antiquity. Though it has many uses it is extremely toxic to humans and as such, has been regulated by government agencies throughout the world. Awareness is growing, but people are still exposed to lead. Lead: an introduction to help you






Funny-Video-Graphic-Artist-Drawing-Characters

We decided to lighten the mood at Healthy Building Science by creating a funny building science video about what we do. What started off as a standard informational video soon turned into something very different. We hope you enjoy the results of this building science video. In October 2013, we assembled a team consisting of






Blown-in-Cellulose Insulation

Wednesday, 21 August 2013 by
blown-in-cellulose insulation

Blown-in-Cellulose Insulation Test Results On a recent project, we recommended a homeowner try Blown-in-Cellulose insulation as a healthy alternative to other insulation choices. Blown-in-cellulose is known in the healthy materials world as a pretty safe insulation choice. But just to be sure the product was safe, we sent a wet sample to a lab for






Antioch College Internship

Tuesday, 05 March 2013 by
Antioch College Internship

Healthy Building Science has officially employed two Antioch College students. I did my first “co-op” in 1996 in a peace camp deep in the heart of Chiapas during the Zapatista uprising. Funny how the circle comes all the way around. Dustin Mapel is an Antioch student currently interning with Healthy Building Science. Antioch has long






Healthy Building Checklists

Tuesday, 19 February 2013 by
Healthy Building Checklists

This is the second in a series of blogs diving deeper into the Healthy Building Rating System’s Healthy Home Standard. There are four healthy building checklists within the Healthy Home Standard: Qualification Checklist, Indoor Air Quality Checklist, Electromagnetic Radiation Checklist, and Water Quality Checklist. This blog reviews the first and perhaps most important  of the






IEQ Investigations – The 4 P’s

Wednesday, 02 January 2013 by
IEQ investigations

IEQ Investigations – The 4 P’s Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) is critical for occupant comfort, productivity, and well-being. An IEQ investigation should be performed proactively in order to avoid occupant complaints and decreased productivity, and to minimize long-term damage to building materials. Too often, IEQ investigations are made reactively – in response to occupant complaints or known






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Exposure Limits in US

Exposure Limits in US – Alphabet Soup Exposure Limits in US should be super simple. “Do not exceed #.” But it’s a government regulatory issue… so how simple could it be? Here is a summary of the primary exposure limits used by our government and industrial hygienists in the United States. Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) – OSHA






Mold Testing is a Bad Idea?

Tuesday, 11 December 2012 by
mold testing

Mold Testing is a Bad Idea? “Mold testing” is commonly requested. People like the idea of collecting samples and getting actual data back from a microbiological lab, but mold testing results are highly variable and easily misinterpreted. For there to be statistical significance in the results there must be many samples collected, and most project






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GreenBuild VOC Sampling - Alex Stadtner

Comparing Air Quality Results from Green Festival and GreenBuild San Francisco For those curious about indoor air quality… we are comparing air quality results from Green Festival and GreenBuild San Francisco. This is a very limited sampling method and sample size, so take these results with a grain of salt. But you must admit it






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